Yarn Safe: Building the campaign | headspace

Yarn Safe: Building the campaign | headspace


(acoustic music) – The young people we engage have… ..have brought some really
interesting perspectives to mental health,
and really opened up the spectrum of what the issues are for aboriginal tradition
on young people. They have talked about some
quite sensitive subjects, and they’ve done it in a way
with respect to one another, in a way now that they’re all family, and they all have come together
as a support for one another and a united voice. And headspace listens to
what they have to say. – You start with nothing, and you
say, “What is it?” and you prepare
yourself for whatever that may be. And I think what that
allows is for young people to grow in themselves,
but also gives you something that is really
genuine, and real, and, it sounds really corny, but it actually is the thing that young people will
respond to the most. – I think it’s important to
involve youth in this process, because at the end of the day our messaging, and what
we hope to achieve, is a campaign for the youth. – It’s really difficult for young
people to talk to people, so this is why it’s
important for mental health to start talking, to
start engaging with youth. To get us talking and getting
around these kinds of issues. – For me the most important thing was to always bring it, the
community, back into it, to reach your brothers and
sisters in the community, ’cause that’s what it’s aimed for,
and, to, yeah, make it
accessible to as many people as we can who are struggling, so they can get the help
that they need, as well. That they might not be
aware of these services, or might not feel that they
have support to go to them. – It brings a uniqueness to the,
to the campaign that we knew was sort of gonna be
there, but gee, when you look at the, when you reflect on the
conversations that were had, and when you look at the finished
product, we would never have got there
on our own. – They felt like they could share specific issues for their community. And we saw a diversity in remote
to quite regional and metro areas. So the issues were not too different, but depending on which
community you come from, you’ve got different issues
and different barriers to mental health services. – From the very first day that headspace, Gilimbaa,
and the Youth Reference Group got together we knew that
we were creating something very special. The Youth Reference Group
burst out of the blocks, all coming from different
corners of Australia wanting to represent themselves,
their stories and their communities. So when you stood back
and when you looked at the walls and what everyone
had been talking about over the two days when
we were all together, initially we were kind of looking for a needle in the haystack and the story wasn’t a
needle in the haystack, the story was the haystack. So our job is to now
create a campaign that actually shows the
diversity of Australia, the diversity of opinion, the diversity of what
youth are going through out in communities. You see that diversity in issues and circumstances come to life and what we call the life mess, which is an incredible illustration brought together by
the youth and Gilimbaa. You have our master, you
have our campaign headline, which is “Got a Lot Going On,” and that represents very much the discovery around,
it’s not one thing, it’s everything happening
all at once. You’ve got our beautiful song line that sweeps across the bottom
of the campaign posters, representing pride and culture. And that is just at the heartbeat of
every single person that we talk to. – Essentially what the song line
does, it calms everything through the life mess. And it brings people back
to where they belong, so that they have that connection, and that they feel that
this is a safe place to talk about their issues, and, essentially, for
them to grow stronger. Another great aspect was
the inclusion of the flags, but also the acknowledgment, the acknowledgment of
country by headspace. – (Voiceover) The ability for young
people to have a safe environment in which to yarn about
the issues in their life was very, very important. And from that, that’s where we got the yarn safe – your
space – headspace idea. – I think there’s been moments, I think there’s little moments
where someone will say, “Rodrick, I think we
need to have a song line, that would work really well.” And everyone goes,
“Oh, that’s just perfect.” And if someone says something and the whole group says,
“That’s it! That’s exactly it!” And then there was the moment today when you guys showed the song line in the different colours using the Aboriginal-Torres Islander
flag, and the whole room just went, “Yes!” And you just go, “Yeah! We’ve got it” – I’ve definitely learned
about the creative process. And you can give a lot of yourself
to it. – I think it’s bringing a
form of unified resilience and being able to share
your strengths with others. And, I mean, our culture can be really defined by
our community strength, and that’s something that I really
believe we can enhance together, and why this whole project
has been so amazing. (acoustic music)

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