Corespun Yarns: Artistic Variations

Corespun Yarns: Artistic Variations


The first artistic implementation of core-spun,
is the insertion of slubs and coils. In the previous videos we saw how to form slubs starting from a slub yarn in which these structures are hooked on in the twisting phase. In this case we need to prepare the fibres ready to be slubbed. A fibre that turns out very interesting for this purpose, is combed cotton ribbon because as you can see it’s very tenacious, it tears without thinning and is rigid enough to stay in shape when it’s made into coils. So we’re going to arrange sections of fibres to have next to us, that have to be approximately 8-10cm long, finger width and more importantly very compact. Let’s start by spinning the core-spun and go on until we get to the point where we place the first slub; ora lasciamo la solita coda libera di
fibre lunga pochi centimetri now let’s leave the usual few cm long free tail of fibre
and insert the tip of the cotton ribbon between the fibres and the core, pedaling slowly with our right hand accompanying the slub to the core making it rotate both on itself and around the core in this way. When we’ve got to the end of the cotton fibre, again hook the fibres to be spun so that they overlap by at least a cm and can trap and keep the slub still. To create this structure, we can alternatively use wool from a thin and compact fibre such as ultrafine merino wool which will maintain the ball like shape of the slub. Looking at the finished yarn, we can see how the cotton slubs stick out really well, bringing out the sleekness and silkiness of the fibres. In addition to the slubs, core-spun is a yarn that offers itself to fold into other shapes. An interesting example could be using light and shiny fibres such as silk and mohair, working with their length and the ease with which they disentangle and store air. Let’s try and prepare small quantities of well opened and divided fibres and start spinning the base body of the core-spun; once you’ve got to the point where we want to shape our insert, hook the tip of our ball of fibre onto the base ones but carefully: we’re going to continue spinning the fibres of the base body of the yarn and at the same time let the clouds hook around it. Once the balls of fibres of our insert is finished, we’re going to attach it blending it into the base fibres, like we saw for the other core-spun yarn inserts too. The shape of this yarn, as we can tell, can vary hugely, even just by changing the quantity of fibre to inset into the clouds, and above all, the tension with which we’ll attach them to the yarn. We’ve just learnt that one of the characteristics of core-spun yarn is that the surface looks like a single ply thread; now let’s try and see what happens if we want to combine it with a doubled thread. Auto-wrap This combination of threads occurs in a single step on the spinning wheel and attaches well to the core-spun, as we’ll see that the thread to be wrapped around will follow the same way as the fibres, rolling up on itself on the core. This technique is advisable when we’ve gained some confidence with core-spun, because our hands have to be able to measure out the fibres and check that the thread doesn’t get stuck and/or entangles with the core at the same time and that it spreads out nicely along the artistic yarn. You usually choose an impressive thread, like the metallic ones or otherwise contrasting colours. It will be us who chooses that the thread has a constant and regular pace, or to arrange it randomly, even without overlapping or affecting the body of the yarn. In the finished yarn, we can see how the presence of the overlapping artistic thread emphasizes the arrangement of the fibres and colours. Core-spun twisting Let’s see what happens if instead, we decide to spin our core-spun and then try twisting it as if it were a “conventional” yarn. The fact that we wrapped some fibres around an already finished and strong thread, will mean the core-spun won’t be very flexible to mould itself when joining the doubled thread, so the shape we’re going to get, if we maintain an “average” twisting angle, will generally be a really chunky round coil. We’re going to choose a fairly strong twisting thread that’s not too thin and try to change the doubling angle, like we did for the slubs. Then we’re going to keep the doubling thread in a straight line with the entrance hole of the spinning wheel and keep the core-spun yarn at an angle of about 90 degrees: we’ll see that a very tight coil piping is formed, like a single slub throughout the whole length of the yarn. In the finished yarn it’s clear to see how the final thickness increases considerably. So, keep this in mind when choosing this technique. These variations of the core-spun allow you to mix it up with different combinations of materials and colours, creating yarns to wear or work as little as possible like jewellery, so as not to hide the structure and all the details that have been embedded.

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